The little things? The little moments? They aren't little.
Jon Kabat-Zinn

Introduction to Groups and Classes

Some people find that being able to share their experiences, feelings, thoughts, and behaviors regarding their loss with others helps them in their mourning.  The mutual giving and receiving  of support with others can be an important aid as they rebuild their world after a death.  To help with this process, I conduct various groups targeting specific types of deaths.

Read more: Introduction to Groups and Classes

H.O.P.E. Perinatal Loss

The experience of a perinatal loss is a significant event in the lives of parents and grandparents, often one that shapes the disappointing and heartbreaking chapters in their life stories.  Since 2003 I have been conducting the H.O.P.E. (Helping Ourselves through this Perinatal Experience) Perinatal Loss Group, a support group specifically designed for those in the Austin and Central Texas area who have experienced a perinatal loss.  HOPE provides a safe place for parents to discover their own answers to some of the questions that consume them following their loss, to help them make meaning of their loss, and, eventually, to find peace.

Read more: H.O.P.E. Perinatal Loss

Loss of Child

Many people consider the death of a child, regardless of age, to be one of the most difficult losses to endure.  It is not the normal course of nature - children are supposed to bury their parents, not the other way around.  Since 2004 I have been conducting Loss of Child Group specifically designed for those in the Austin area who have experienced the death of a child under the age of 18.  The group provides a safe place for parents to discover their own answers to some of the questions that consume them following their loss, help them make meaning of their loss, and, eventually, to find peace.

Read more: Loss of Child

One Year Left


"Death destroys a man, the idea of Death saves him."
E.M. Forster

Since ancient times, we have been reminded that our physical existence on this earth is limited. From Socrates to the Dalai Lama, we are admonished to practice dying, prepare for death.  All of the major religions teach that this life as we know it is not permanent and that we should prepare for what comes afterwards.  In the Hindu tradition, the belief is that a person's death reflects one's life.  A well-known example is the assassination of Mahatma Gandhi.  After being shot in the chest three times and before he died, he repeatedly stated the name of Ram, the Hindu deity representing compassion, courage, and devotion to religious values and duty.  As he died, Gandhi reflected the same compassion, courage, and devotion he had practiced during his life.  He had prepared for his death.

Read more: One Year Left